Five Most Popular Prawn Species Eaten Around The World

 

To some, shrimp appears to be a simple seafood option. As per the point of view of seafood exporters, there’s not much of a difference once you pick between fresh and frozen fish, tail-on or peeled and deveined. They’re pink, C-shaped, and long. They taste heavenly if served with a little cocktail sauce on the side for dipping. Briefly to present it differently, when it pertains to shrimp, the universe is your oyster when it comes to what you can serve for supper.

The globe blessed mankind with a wide variety of prawns and baby shrimps. The seafood exporters in Pakistan win the challenge when it comes to identifying which prawn species will taste rubbery or makeup to tasteless shrimp cocktail, and which shrimp will taste buttery while melting straight in your mouth by winning your heart.  

As per the seafood exporters and fish farmers, things can rapidly move from being simple to being overwhelming and even complex. When you contemplate that there have been over 300 distinct species of prawns in the world.

Since the distinguishing method between different types of shrimp might be confusing, so let’s clear up any misunderstandings with professional lingo and simple explanations. 

From Malaysia’s meaty freshwater prawns to Taiwan’s teeny-tiny baby saltwater shrimps, the ocean’s best-tasting bounty is at your fingertips. In case you aren’t familiar with prawn hunting, it can be challenging. Fortunately, we’ve covered the fundamentals of the most common prawn species for you.

Let’s dive into the different types of shrimps you’re most likely to fall for.

Rock Shrimp 

The hard, calcification shell of the rock shrimp gave the species its nomenclature i.e. “rock shrimp”. These shrimps can grow about 3 inches long. Because of the solid skin, they are a treat for grilled shrimps lovers. Make sure you have removed the shells through culinary scissors once rock shrimps are cooked. 

Native to

Found in the deep blue warm waters of the Atlantic. The rock shrimps are mainly cultivated in the Gulf of Mexico starting from Florida to the Bahamas.

Size

 2 to 3 inches long

How they taste like?

This dish’s flavor is often compared to that of lobsters or Dungeness crab because of the meaty and buttery flavor in it.

Fun fact:

These shrimp are tough to remove and eat because of their extremely hard shells. Until special equipment was invented to separate the shell and the head, only the fisherman who caught them were willing to do the operation. Rock shrimp are now almost always sold deveined and skinned.

Pink Shrimp

The process of determining pink shrimp all year round because is also known as Gulf Pink Prawns, and it is a huge, meaty shrimp. The southern Florida coast is home to the largest population of pink shrimp, which are caught using trawl nets. To bring out the natural sweetness of these huge, plump shrimp. You can toss them in a number of ways, including simmering, roasting, pan-frying, or steaming.

Native to

They are found from the waters of Chesapeake Bay through the route of Mexico Gulf which lies south of the Yucatan Peninsula. 

Size

Up to 11 inches long!

How they taste like?

It has a luscious sweetness to it, as well as a bouncy mouthfeel.

An interesting tidbit

Gulf prawns are nocturnal creatures. At night, they emerge from their sand burrows, where they spend the day feeding and mating. This shields them from the elements and dangerous predators.

Tiger Shrimp

The red and black striped patterning that occurs after cooking gives this saltwater shrimp its title. Peeled prawns turn orange when cooked, but shrimp roasted in the shell turn redder. According to the seafood exporters who are operational globally, farming is the ultimate method of obtaining these shrimp. Ultimately, a few of them are gathered from the ocean floor using trawl nets, which might harm the environment and catch unintended prey. Moreover, to be safe, always look for Fair Trade Certified fish.

prawns

Native to

Southeast Asia, especially coming from southern Vietnam

Size

Tiger shrimp grow up to 13 inches long, but most are cultivated between the range of 9 and 11 inches. 

How they taste like?

Tiger shrimp farmed in captivity tend to have a milder taste than wild-caught ones with a salty, seafood-forward aroma and taste.

Intriguing fact

Tiger prawns are the world’s largest prawns sold commercially. 

Chinese White Shrimp

The Chinese cold-water shrimp, which are about the size of little shrimp comes forth under the list of most eaten prawns. Conversely, they have a sensitive deliciousness just because of that, even before cooking. A simple stir-fry served with Asian vegetables and lots of spices are one classic way to prepare Chinese White Shrimp. In a hot wok, the shrimps are prepared for about two minutes before they become delicately flaky.

Native to

China, primarily found in the Yellow Sea and near the shores of East China Sea

Size

Up to 7 inches 

How they taste like?

The tiny white prawns have a mild flavor and a likely to be comfortable texture to taste buds.

Fun fact

Disease decimated the Chinese White Shrimp population in the late 1900s. In order to replenish the stock, Chinese authorities released young shrimp into the ocean, and the population ever since has been rebounded.

Brown Shrimp

When it comes to aroma, these brown-shelled shrimp are a standout. They’re common in rich, flavorful Gulf Coast cuisines like New Orleans jambalaya, where they add heft and tasteful depth. As per NOAA, brown shrimp habitats are healthy and this variety is ethically fished to keep them that way. In addition to that, Brown Shrimp Communities Are Healthy As Per NOAA.

Native to

Found in the cold deep waters of the Atlantic in Massachusetts south to the Yucatan peninsula. 

Size

Up to 7 inches

How they taste like?

These are among the shrimpiest-tasting shrimp you’ll ever encounter, with a bold, salty flavor that really shines.

Fun fact

Iodine-rich meals are what give brown shrimp their distinctive color. Thus marking a strong place in the list of popular prawn species. 

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